Research Studies Evaluating the Effectivenss of Reflexology in Psychological Based Conditions:

  1. FOOT REFLEXOLOGY THERAPY IN NEUROSISM: CLINICAL OBSERVATION OF 20 CASES
    By Duan Shuang-Feng, Department of Physiotherapy, 52884 Military Hospital, China

    Twenty cases of neurasthenics (nervous prostration), 8 males and 12 females, with clinical courses ranging from 1 to 8 years, were treated with daily foot reflexology therapy. All patients had received various long-term medical treatments with poor effects. A course of treatment was seven days. Results: 8 cases (40%) cured, free of symptoms; 7 cases (35%) greatly improved, nearly free of symptoms; 3 cases (15%) mildly improved, symptoms reduced: 2 cases (10%) unchanged, no relief after two courses of therapy.

     

  2. THE EFFECTS OF REFLEXOLOGY TREATMENT ON PATIENT DEPENDENCY RATINGS
    By Anne Craig and Hugh Rooney, Corstorphine Hospital, Edinburgh, Scotland

    The main purpose of this study was to determine whether regular reflexology treatments would have a beneficial effect on patient dependency ratings, and, to assess the extent to which the patients valued the reflexology treatment. Eighteen patients were selected and randomly assigned to a treatment group that received reflexology treatment, and a control group that received light foot massage. The results showed improvement in dependency scores was more marked in the reflexology group and greater deterioration in the control group over eight weeks. It was concluded that reflexology is a potentially valuable means of enhancing the well being of elderly patients.

     

  3. WAS IT THE FOOT MASSAGE THAT MADE THE ELDERLY PATIENTS LESS FRAUGHT?
    By Mike Thomas RMN, Salford School of Nursing, Manchester, U.K.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of reflexology on elderly patients, and, to record the attitudes of 14 nurses to reflexology. Nine patients who exhibited signs of anxiety were studied over eight days. They were divided into three groups: The treatment group had daily one-hour reflexology sessions and measured their own subjective anxiety levels pre and post sessions. Group 2 had one- hour pleasant conversations with staff and measured their own subjective anxiety levels pre and post sessions. Group 3 had no staff interaction and measured their own subjective anxiety levels at 2 p.m. and 3p.m. In the treatment group all three patients experienced a drop in anxiety levels. One client began at level 8 and dropped to 4, and one from 5 to 1. In group 2 the results were not so dramatic with a drop of 1-3. In group 3 anxiety levels rose or stayed the same, with a fall on one occasion only. Before the study none of the nurses saw reflexology as an appropriate intervention, after the study 12 nurses saw reflexology as a useful intervention.